Tuesday, April 27, 2010

Still Time to Bomb the Borer

The Indian summer that we have enjoyed over the past months seems to have extended the period that borer beetles have been on the wing as adults. This means that there is still time to use borer bombs (NO Bug Borafume) to knock down the adult beetles and stop them laying eggs on timbers such as your sub-floor.

However, the long term treatments for protecting your floor, wall and roof timbers from borer attack can be carried out at any time of the year. Treating timbers with NO Borer Concentrate or ready to use fluid  or NO Borer injector controls the borer larvae that do the damage inside the wood and prevent adults laying eggs on the wood. Such treatment can give more than 10 years protection to timbers.

Damage of sub-floor and weather board timbers are the most likely and the easiest to identify. Flight holes are easily seen in the exterior of painted weather boards, sofits and barge boards. The holes are between 1mm and 3mm in diameter. These are created where the borer larvae pupate near the surface and the adult beetle eats its way out, usually between October and March. There are likely to be many more flight holes on the internal surfaces of weatherboard timbers than on the exterior and on sub-floor surfaces than top surfaces of floor timbers. As you can see in the photograph above borer can cause considerable damage to timbers without many flight holes being visible. In the photo of a floorboard the damage is largely limited to the lower half of the board. This is because borer prefer to emerge in dark areas away from light and they prefer a little moisture in the timber that comes from the ground below.

The adults beetles mate and the female looks for bare untreated timber to lay her eggs. Often she will lay the eggs in an old flight hole. So treatment of flight holes with a NO Borer Injector will deny the flight holes as places of re-infestation.


Knock knock. Who's there?
"Woodworm."
"Woodworm who?"
"Woodworm hole be enough or would you like two?"

6 comments:

  1. Hi, I'm wanting to treat a couple of pieces of furniture, however, I'm breastfeeding a 5 month old baby, and wondered about the toxicity of Kiwicare No Borer. Is it safe for me to use, or should my husband treat the pieces? Also, how long will it take for the wood to be safe for a baby to touch (and then put her hands in her mouth)?
    Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hello Modern Mother,

    You can treat your furniture with Kiwicare NO Borer products without risk to your breast feeding baby. Of course it is wise to wear protective equipment including gloves, overalls (or old clothes), etc. and wash off any product you might spill on your skin or clothes.

    Wipe excess NO Borer from the surface of the furniture and allow the timber to dry completely. The furniture will then be safe for you or your child to touch.

    I hope that is of help.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi there,

    When is the best time during the fkight season to borer bomb and how often during the flight season should you bomb? thanks

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi,

    Good question. The best time to 'bomb' is when you first see the borer beetles or you begin to see new holes appearing in your wood. There is a tendency for borer in the same place to emerge at approximately the same time.

    However, there will be variation, and it is not always possible to identify when borer are emerging. It is good practice to bomb twice in a season (Oct-Mar) and I would suggest two months apart.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I want to use a borer bomb between now and March and am wondering what time of day borer beetles are likely to be on the fly so I can use it when it's most effective?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello,
      Using the Kiwicare NO Bugs Borafume fumigator is equally effective at any time of the day. Beetles are more likely to be flying during the day but the product will kill beetles that are not flying.
      Kind Regards
      David

      Delete

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